Origami Elephants Podcast

 

 

Origami Elephants walks the tightrope between religion and philosophy, faith and certainty, symbol and science. Hosts Bryne Lewis and JR. Forasteros tackle the elephants in the room, talking about issues that often go ignored for fear of a fight. Bryne, JR. and their guests initiate a conversation about controversial subjects with an invitational tone.

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Origami Elephants - June 10, 2016

Gorillas in the Zoo with Tripp York

Gorillas in the Zoo with Tripp York

Bryne and JR. welcome author and professor Tripp York to discuss the recent death of Harambe the gorilla at the Cincinnati zoo. Bringing insights from his book THE END OF CAPTIVITY to bear, Tripp invites us to consider the very nature of zoos - and the animal kingdom.

From Series: "Origami Elephants Season 3"

Bryne and JR. return with more topics, more guests and more movies (probably). Listen up and weigh in, as always!

More From "Origami Elephants Season 3"

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Meet the Hosts

Bryne Lewis Headshot

Bryne Lewis

Born and raised in Scranton, PA Bryne Lewis is a philosopher, poet, writer and teacher. Bryne is an adjunct instructor with classes in philosophy, ethics and religion. Her poems have appeared in Janus Head: A Journal of Philosophy and Art, The Anglican Theological Journal and other publications. In 2010, her poem “Conjoined” won first prize in the “Love at the Mutter” poetry contest, sponsored by the Mutter Museum, Philadelphia, PA. Bryne is the co-ordinator of the Sit Next to Me! Film Festival, featuring films stories that illustrate our universal need to belong and our personal responsibility to make others feel welcome. Bryne works out her philosophical demons at brynelewis.com.

 

JR. Forasteros

JR. lives in Dallas, TX with his wife Amanda. He’s a writer, blogger and pastor (in the Church of the Nazarene). He also loves Batman, spirited debates and smoking meats. Check out his blog for his sermon podcast. In addition to Origami Elephants, JR. also cohosts the StoryMen (history, theology and pop culture), Bible Bites (education and theology) and Don’t Split Up! (horror films). He also blogs on faith and pop culture right here on NorvilleRogers.com. Follow him on Twitter or say Hi on Facebook.

Gorillas in the Zoo with Tripp York

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Gorillas in the Zoo with Tripp York

Bryne and JR. welcome author and professor Tripp York to discuss the recent death of Harambe the gorilla at the Cincinnati zoo. Bringing insights from his book THE END OF CAPTIVITY to bear, Tripp invites us to consider the very nature of zoos – and the animal kingdom. 

In This Episode

2:00 – Coming Soon

Origami Elephants - June 10, 2016

Gorillas in the Zoo with Tripp York

Gorillas in the Zoo with Tripp York

Bryne and JR. welcome author and professor Tripp York to discuss the recent death of Harambe the gorilla at the Cincinnati zoo. Bringing insights from his book THE END OF CAPTIVITY to bear, Tripp invites us to consider the very nature of zoos - and the animal kingdom.

From Series: "Origami Elephants Season 3"

Bryne and JR. return with more topics, more guests and more movies (probably). Listen up and weigh in, as always!

More From "Origami Elephants Season 3"

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The Zika Virus and the Problem of Existence

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The Zika Virus and the Problem of Existence

Origami Elephants returns after an extended hiatus! Maybe it’s Bryne’s new baby, but we’ve been thinking about Zika, and the implications the virus has for questions of human existence. Listen up as we debate life, death and everything in between. 

In This Episode

2:00 – Coming Soon!

Origami Elephants - May 30, 2016

The Zika Virus and the Problem of Human Existence

The Zika Virus and the Problem of Human Existence

Origami Elephants returns after an extended hiatus! Maybe it's Bryne's new baby, but we've been thinking about Zika, and the implications the virus has for questions of human existence. Listen up as we debate life, death and everything in between.

From Series: "Origami Elephants Season 3"

Bryne and JR. return with more topics, more guests and more movies (probably). Listen up and weigh in, as always!

More From "Origami Elephants Season 3"

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Focus on Spotlight

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Focus on Spotlight

Since writing my post about new stories that shun the traditional virtue narrative, I’ve had the chance to watch Spotlight and think it’s another excellent example of this new kind of storytelling.

The film focuses on the team of investigative journalists that exposed and documented the sex abuse scandal within the Boston Catholic Archdiocese. Like The Big Short, the film turns what might be considered less than exciting material (clip-hunting, interview-hounding, data-cleaning research) into a compelling visual story. Also like The Big Short, Spotlight chooses to highlight the immense obstacle of institutional failure over the traditional story of individual character triumphing over adversity.

On the most recent episode of Origami Elephants, JR and I discussed some noticeable differences in this kind of storytelling. First, the protagonist tends to be a team rather than an individual. In Spotlight, our “hero” is a team of four journalists, plus their managing editor and the recently installed editor-in-chief. Second, the film doesn’t take the shortcut of setting up an individual villain. In fact, Spotlight doggedly directs its investigations toward the institution. When the team reports that they have evidence of a cover up by Cardinal Bernard Law, their editor-in-chief, Marty Baron (played brilliantly by Liev Schreiber), instructs them to continue researching in order to establish a systemwide culpability that cannot be dismissed as “bad apple” individual behavior.

The only place that I think Spotlight falls short of the storytelling in The Big Short is when it is revealed that team leader, Walter “Robby” Robinson, was one of the reporters who silenced the original inquiry into the sex abuse scandal. In The Big Short, the audience struggles with the protagonists as they each deal with the realization of, not only the staggering scale of the financial crisis, but more importantly their personal involvement in it. On the other hand, “the Robinson reveal” is quickly defused; the characters and therefore the audience are not allowed to grapple with the moment in the same way. To be fair, I think the scene in question was used by the writers more with the intention to move Marty Baron’s character forward than to complete a moral arc. However, I think it’s a significant omission. One of the tragedies of institutional brokenness is the way that even heroes are dragged into cooperation and collusion with it.

All in all, Spotlight is a fantastic film in a genre that only seems to be gaining momentum. Who knows, maybe we’ll even see a movie willing to take on #OscarsSoWhite.

The Problem with the Virtuous Hero

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The Problem with the Virtuous Hero

Bryne and JR. recap some of our favorite films of a very good year, then dive into a couple that signal a shift in how we are telling stories as a culture. The Big ShortSicario and Netflix’ Making a Murderer demonstrate an important shift away from the traditional virtue narrative Americans like so much toward more complicated, complex and honest storytelling. We evaluate this shift, and why we are so excited for it.

In This Episode

2:00 – Best Movies of 2015

7:00 – Coming Soon

Origami Elephants - January 9, 2016

The Problem with the Virtuous Hero

The Problem with the Virtuous Hero

Bryne and JR. recap some of our favorite films of a very good year, then dive into a couple that signal a shift in how we are telling stories as a culture. The Big Short, Sicario and Netflix' Making a Murderer demonstrate an important shift away from the traditional virtue narrative Americans like so much toward more complicated, complex and honest storytelling. We evaluate this shift, and why we are so excited for it.

From Series: "Origami Elephants Season 2"

Bryne and JR. are back with more guests, more movies and more hard-hitting exploration of those elephants.

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Moral Storytelling in The Big Short and Making a Murderer

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Moral Storytelling in The Big Short and Making a Murderer

American audiences love a good hero. By hero, I mean to indicate that central figure who bravely battles difficult circumstances to emerge victorious. By good, I would like to emphasize that it is typically by the strength of the hero’s moral character that the victory is understood to be won. While over time our heroes have become more flawed and/or conflicted, the basic story of personal virtue prevailing against trial, tribulation and temptation remains popular. Within the discipline of ethics, this story arc most resembles virtue ethics, famously formulated by Aristotle. Happiness is earned by the person who struggles to cultivate a virtuous character through the acquisition of good habits, seasoned with the wisdom to know how and when to employ them. Both the Harry Potter and Hunger Games franchises reduce to virtue narratives. Harry and Katniss win in the end because of the exemplary persons they were from the beginning. American Sniper is another good example. Chris Kyle’s inner strength eventually returns him to his family after the horrors of war threaten to claim him permanently.

At first glance, virtue centered storytelling seems harmless, even inspiring. If I am a good person and hold to my core values, then I will persevere and receive just reward for my efforts. However, the corollary is less harmless. If I fail, then I am not a good person and am not entitled to persevere or to reward. Popular prejudices against the poor evidence thinking along these lines. Often it is assumed that their situation is the result of personal failing: laziness, stupidity, slovenliness. The suggestion of institutional unfairness is dismissed as encouraging irresponsibility, a dangerous denial of culpability. By focusing so tightly on personal virtue, we can turn a blind eye to systematic failures, especially those constraining an individual’s ability to make good moral decisions.*

Recently, I’ve noticed an encouraging uptick in stories that put the system’s failures in frame. Over the break, I had the opportunity to see The Big Short and consume (alright, binge through) Making a Murderer.** Both of these stories are worth watching for a number of reasons. The Big Short impressed me with its jump cut, self-aware narrative style. Making a Murderer features a female led production team, not to mention a fantastic opening theme. But what I found particularly noteworthy is the way the moral choices of the individuals within these stories become less important than the evaluation of the systems in which those moral decisions are being made.

tbs_1-sht_teaserThe Big Short takes a hard look at the housing market crash of 2007 from the perspective of a few, eclectic investors who saw it coming. At first, the protagonists believe they are rightfully taking advantage of Big Bank’s sloppy handling of the mortgage market. However, it soon becomes apparent that the system is not clumsy, but criminal. At this point in the story, our investors find themselves implicated in that they stand to profit from the catastrophic downfall of the global economy. By presenting their varying degrees of comfort with this eventuality, the movie refrains from passing judgment on the actions of the protagonist investors, instead focusing on the sickening lack of justice brought to bear against the financial system as a whole. Also, the film avoids personifying the banking system in an arch villain. In a way that is similar to the portrayal of the protagonists, we interact with the banking institution through a crowded cast, each at different levels of involvement and odiousness. In this way, the movie does real work to keep the audience from settling into a personal virtue narrative.

Making a Murderer is a documentary series that focuses on the case of Steven Avery. Avery was wrongly imprisoned for 18 years on sexual assault charges. Shortly after his release, Avery then finds himself at the center of a murder investigation, which eventually results in his re-imprisonment. Covering the details of both cases, the documentary squarely focuses on the conduct of law enforcement and the fairness of the criminal justice system throughout. What the audience sees is a system susceptible to personal prejudice and institutional mechanisms that move most easily for those in its employ. The documentary has been criticized for not including evidence considered to implicate Avery in the murder more deeply. However, I found that the series withholds judgment about Avery in favor of questioning the system’s ability to judge. Of all the theories currently being circulated online about the outcomes of the case, perhaps the most disturbing conclusion is that profound institutional brokenness might render individual moral decisions irrelevant to justice.

The narrative shift away from virtue storytelling and toward depicting systematic failures is an important trend especially as it intersects with the national conversation about privilege. Inherent to the concept of privilege is that only a select group of people within the community enjoy the full benefits of the community. The everyday experience of everyone else is sub par; the system does not work for them; it is broken. The fault then lies with a system which privileges few with its full function. The system’s shortcomings, rather than individual culpability, need to be our focus in the future. When the entertainment industry defends its depiction of violence and sex, it often claims that it is merely delivering to the American audience what it wants to see. Here’s hoping that stories that put the institutional failure center frame are an indication that America is waking up to the reality that fighting to make the good available to all is as heroic as it gets.

*A similar criticism is made against Aristotle’s virtue ethics. He admits that the conditions for cultivating the virtuous life include things like good health, family and education, which are not elective and not available universally. In addition, the traits considered virtuous by Aristotle are defined by norms for upper class males of his time. Therefore, with these two factors in mind, his conception of ethics is a privileged system (see definition of privilege at the end of the article).
**Although I saw it much earlier in the year, I would also nominate Sicario for this category.

 

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